mental health

Pokemon Go: Helping Players' Mental Health

It's only been out for days, but Pokemon Go is taking the world by storm. The app-based game combines the virtual world with the real world by tasking players to hunt Pokemon in the real world. 

Intended or not, players are getting out and about, what researchers have proven to be effective in treatment of depression

It's a great step in the gaming world, connecting the virtual and real worlds to encourage movement and socialization.

Unpredictability the greatest source of workplace stress

A recent survey from CareerCast, a job-hunting website, finds unpredictability is the greatest cause of workplace stress in America.

"But that pervasive sense of insecurity comes in many forms, ranging from employees being tasked with new duties and sudden staff changes to unexpected shifts in company priorities. Other sources of stress that ranked nearly as high as unpredictability included workplace environment (21 percent) and deadlines (20 percent).

Among the professions that found unpredictability to be the biggest source of stress were those in academia (40 percent), engineering (33 percent) and customer service (30 percent), while only 15 percent of transportation workers found unpredictability to be a stress factor at work."

Managing stress in the workplace is difficult, but possible. Surrounding yourself with positive people, focusing on your accomplishments, and looking for opportunities to learn can improve your experience.

Humans of New York on Anxiety

A brilliant post about anxiety from the Human of New York:

“I knew a girl in high school that always complained about having anxiety. I used to make fun of her a little bit. It looked like nothing to me. So I assumed it was nothing. And I dealt with it by trying to convince her that it was nothing. I called her recently to apologize. I’ve had really bad anxiety ever since my father died. And it’s definitely not nothing. It’s the indescribable fear of nothing.”

Binge-watching tied to depression, loneliness

The fourth season of House of Cards just hit Netflix yesterday and the people in my life have already asked if I've had a chance to watch it yet. 

With instant streaming and Netflix releasing seasons at once, binge-watching, watching multiple episodes of television at a time, has become a pretty standard part of the American lifestyle.

A recent study from the University of Texas at Austin found the lonelier and depressed you are, the more likely you are to binge-watch television.

"Physical fatigue and problems such as obesity and other health problems are related to binge-watching and they are a cause for concern. When binge-watching becomes rampant, viewers may start to neglect their work and their relationships with others. Even though people know they should not, they have difficulty resisting the desire to watch episodes continuously," said the researchers.

"Do I really need therapy?"

Knowing when to ask for help a brave and courageous step. How do you know when or if you need therapy?

We all experience a range of emotions, from happiness and excitement, to grief and stress, and none of this is necessarily problematic. However, if your emotions feel out of control or unmanageable, it's time to seek help from a psychotherapist.

If you struggle with regular eating, hear voices, or have difficulty sleeping through the night, it's time to seek help.

If your relationships are suffering, be it a parent/child relationship, spousal relationship, friendship, etc., it's time to seek help. 

If you find yourself using (and/or abusing) substances to cope with unwanted feelings, it's time to seek help. 

If you no longer find pleasure from activities you used to enjoy, it's time to seek help.

If a friend, family member, or loved one suggests you need help, it's time to seek help.

A trusted relationship with a mental health counselor can drastically improve your life. 

What I'm Reading

There's never a shortage of great reading material on mental health. I recently stopped at the store to pick up a couple things:

Buddha's Brain: The Practical Neuroscience of Happiness, Love & Wisdom by Rick Hanson. A great read on how contemplative practice can help harness your mind to cultivate happiness, love, and wisdom.

And Baby Makes Three: The Six-Step Plan for Preserving Marital Intimacy and Rekindling Romance after Baby Arrives by relationship expert John Gottman. Relationship satisfaction plummets after the arrival of the first child, and Gottman offers six steps to keeping the relationship spark alive during the most difficult first months of a child's life.

The Mindful Way Through Depression: Freeing Yourself from Chronic Unhappiness by Mark Williams, John Teasdale, Zindel Segal, and Jon Kabat-Zinn. Introducing practices of mindfulness and cognitive behavioral therapy, four experts provide meditations and tools to sit with uncomfortable feelings. It's not just "thinking your way" out of depression, but developing a practice that works. 

Drink: The Intimate Relationship Between Women and Alcohol by Ann Dowsett Johnston. Part memoir, part journalistic investigation, Drink explores contemporary trends with women's relationship to alcohol. 

The Gifts of Imperfection: Let Go of Who You Think You're Supposed to be and Embrace Who You Are by shame expert Brene Brown. Brown offers ten guideposts challenging us to change our thinking from "What will people think?" to "I am enough."

Hope and Other Luxuries: A Mother's Life With A Daughter's Anorexia by Clare B. Dunkle. A memoir about a mother's struggle with her daughter's anorexia. Too often we're consumed with focus on the individual struggling with illness, but the entire family suffers.