Managing Holiday Stress

'Tis the season! What's the most wonderful time of the year for some is a complete nightmare for others. The holiday season, stretching from Thanksgiving through New Year's, can often be long, stress-inducing, and painful for people.

Learning how to manage your stress level, especially around the holidays, is a great skill to develop. 

Plan. Start thinking about your holiday plans before they sneak up on you. Who are you celebrating with? Are you traveling? What will you need to do in anticipation of the holidays? Spending time considering the impact your plans have on your life may reduce your stress level.

Set aside differences. Beyond the actual holiday (are you celebrating Christmas? Hanukkah? Kwanzaa?), learning to set aside differences to enjoy time with family and friends is key to reducing stress level. If your Aunt Anne thinks Donald Trump is the best thing to happen to America, just let her. Your brother's kids driving you up the wall and you wish he'd step in to discipline them? Let go of your parenting ideas. Setting your ideas of "how the world should be" aside and allowing everyone to experience it themselves, no matter how frustrating, will reduce your stress level!

Act intentionally. The holidays come with a lot of obligation. You have to make Christmas cookies for the gift exchange party. You always go to your grandmother's house for Christmas Eve, even though you hate it. And if you don't: disaster. Instead of acting out of obligation this year, focus on acting out of intention. What will happen if you don't go to your grandmother's house for Christmas? Could you take her to brunch a week later instead? What will happen if you purchase cookies for the office exchange instead of spending five hours in the kitchen making from scratch? Look beyond your initial reaction to consider what will actually happen. And from there, choose to act intentionally. 

Make a budget. Holidays are expensive! Travel cost, gifts, parties, etc ... it adds up quickly. Spending a few minutes planning your holiday budget will help you feel in control of your finances and live within your means. 

Honor yourself. Above all else, choosing what's best for you is most important! Be reflective. Take inventory of what you're willing to do and what you'd rather not. Stick to your healthy habits. Be mindful of how you feel. If you'd rather stay in with a good book on Saturday night than attend the company holiday party, it's ok to do so. It's ok to take 30 minutes on Christmas morning for a jog. It's also ok to feel occasional sadness, despite the holiday season!

Seek professional help. If your anxiety or depression isn't going anywhere, don't hesitate to see a counselor. Bouncing what's happening off a trained professional may help reduce your symptoms and help you navigate this stressful time.